Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Attachments
  
  
Question
Answer
  
  
  
  
  
  
Deadlines

Intent to Graduate Form must be filed:

August 1, 2018 for August 16, 2018 Graduation
October 1, 2018 for December 17, 2018 Graduation
December 20, 2018 for a May 17, 2019 Graduation

Final Dissertation must be electronically submitted to the Graduate School (in its final form, all edits corrected):

April 23, 2018 for May 18, 2018 Graduation
September 6, 2018 for August 16, 2018 Graduation
January 4, 2018 for December 19, 2018 Graduation
April 22, 2019 for a May 17, 2019 Graduation​

Getting Ready to Graduate
2
Yes
  
OUTgrads

OUTgrads is an LGBTQIA group dedicated to developing community among Washington University graduate and professional students, faculty, and staff of all genders and sexual orientations, promoting awareness of the issues that affect our communities, and facilitating community involvement by our membership. Our organization is open to any member of the Washington University community.

For more information, visit our website https://www.facebook.com/groups/outgrads/about/​ and register for our listserv to get email updates.
Organizations & Campus Groups- Open to All
7
Yes
  
Young Scientist Program (YSP)

The Young Scientist Program (YSP) is designed to attract high school students from disadvantaged backgrounds into scientific careers through activities emphasizing hands-on research and individualized contact between young people and active scientists. In addition, the YSP targets St. Louis City Public High School teachers with resources that facilitate inquiry-based learning in the classroom. Each year, the program reaches hundreds of high school students and teachers in the St. Louis City Public Schools. The program currently is divided into four components, which work in concert with one another to foster high school students’ and teachers’ interest in science: Teaching Teams, Teacher Researcher Partnership Program, and Summer Focus. A unique feature of the program is that it is entirely run by graduate/medical students and postdoc volunteers from the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences. For more information, email yspsf.director@gmail.com​ or call 314-362-7456.

Organizations & Campus Groups- Open to All
9
Yes
  
Chronology

PH.D. THESIS EXAMINATION PROCEDURES

See your student coordinator at least THREE - SIX months prior to thesis examination (defense).

If you are an International student, YOU MUST see the International Office prior to setting up a defense date to discuss your Visa status and its implication.

Intent to Graduate Form - The Office of Student Records requires that you complete the Intent to Graduate Form on-line through WebSTAC, see below for graduation deadlines. If you have any problems locating or completing the form in WebSTAC, please contact the Office of Student Records at (314) 935-5959.
 
PLEASE CONTACT YOUR STUDENT COORDINATOR WHEN YOU FILE YOUR INTENT TO GRADUATE FORM ON WEBSTAC. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOUR STUDENT COORDINATOR KNOW YOUR DEFENSE AND GRADUATION DATE.
 
Read through the Doctoral Dissertatio​n Guide for formatting guidelines and other important information (found at http://graduateschool.wustl.edu/guides-0).
 
ALL FORMS LISTED BELOW MUST BE SUBMITTED TO YOUR COORDINATOR.
 
One Month Before Thesis Examination:
  • Ask your coordinator for the Dissertation Committee Form, have your program director sign the form and return form to your coordinator.
  • Submit your CV and the dissertation abstract.  (Be sure to follow the guidelines in the Doctoral Dissertation Guide booklet). Each should be initialed by the thesis advisor.
  • Email your coordinator the dissertation title, defense date, time and location of thesis examination. It is the student’s responsibility to reserve a room for the thesis examination.  (Thesis Examination information will be published in the DBBS seminar calendar online.)
  • Submit the Payroll/Student Health Form
Two Weeks Before Thesis Examination:
  • Distribute copies of dissertation and a copy of your CV to committee members electronically.  If your PDF file is too large to send by email, we advise you to use the Washington University Large File Transfer System, https://box.wustl.edu/​.  It is a secure and encrypted tool for transferring large files between people and works in a similar manner to Dropbox.  Members of the Wash U community can access this system with their WUSTL Key.
    Note: Your thesis advisor should be listed as the chairperson on your title page and the date would be your degree date (May, August or December are the only options). If you have questions about permission to use published papers in your thesis, contact Nancy Pope, Associate Dean in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, 935-6848.
After Defense:
  • Submit your Thesis Examination Approval form to your coordinator.
  • Submit your finalized dissertation online.  Log on to http://www.etdadmin.com/wustl to create an account. Once your dissertation has been successfully submitted you will receive an email informing you that everything has been received. Final submission must be completed by the deadline, indicated in deadline section below.  Plan to submit your dissertation and paperwork a few days before the deadline. You may need to make corrections to your formatting or fill out additional paperwork.
  • Fill out the Post-Graduation Job​ Survey ahttp://graduateschool.wustl.edu/guides-0​
  • Fill out the Survey of Earned Docto​rates Form at http://graduateschool.wustl.edu/forms-0.
  • Check in with your coordinator to make sure you have submitted everything you need to submit. 
Binding Dissertation
  • If you would like to have your dissertation bound, visit http://wustl.thesisondemand.com/  to upload your thesis and order bound copies. No copies should be ordered until after the electronic submission of a dissertation to ProQuest has been approved by the Graduate School; the pdf uploaded at http://wustl.thesisondemand.com/ should be identical to the approved pdf previously submitted to ProQuest.
  • Note: The price for binding a single dissertation begins at $25 (shipping additional). A $35 Scholar Credit will be applied to each graduating student’s SIS account approximately 30 days after their last stipend check.
  • Should your PI want a copy of your thesis, they can also use the Thesis on Demand site at their own expense. You will need to provide them with an electronic copy of your thesis to utilize this site- http://wustl.thesisondemand.com/.
  • Questions regarding dissertation binding should be directed to Andrew Richards, Director of Alumni Affairs at richardsa@wustl.edu​.
 
REGARDING STUDENT HEALTH COVERAGE:
In most cases, outpatient benefits cease the day the finished dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School, with a grace period providing emergency benefits to continue for an additional 30 days. However, students presenting their thesis in late summer months may find it necessary to pay additional fees, since the billing cycle for the previous semester ends on June 30, with the 30 day grace period extending limited coverage to July 31. Hospitalization and emergency room services only are provided during the grace period.
Getting Ready to Graduate
1
Yes
  
Association of Black Biomedical Graduate Students (ABBGS)

The Association of Black Biomedical Graduate Students (ABBGS) is a student-led organization dedicated to strengthening the social, cultural, and academic well being of black biomedical graduate students at Washington University, while promoting diversity within the campus community. ABBGS welcomes all members of the Washington University community to aid in our mission to heighten cultural awareness on campus and to support active recruitment and retention of a culturally diverse student body.  Contact Ninecia Scott, ninecia.scott@wustl.edu​ for more information.

Organizations & Campus Groups - Graduate Students
5
Yes
  
National Institute of Health

Damien Abreu - Molecular Genetics and Genomics

Ehiole Akhirome - Developmental, Regenerative & Stem Cell Biology

Michael Bern - Immunology

Katherine Conen - Neurosciences

Jennifer Davis - Molecular Cell Biology

Vivek Durai - Immunology

Trent Evans - Molecular Cell Biology

Gary Grajales-Reyes - Immunology

Samarth Hegde​ - Molecular Cell Biology

Amy Herbert - Developmental, Regenerative & Stem Cell Biology

Sarah Kaufman - Neurosciences

Andrew Kraft - Neurosciences

Mariah (Lawler) Hoye - Biochemistry

Vivian Lee Developmental, Regenerative & Stem Cell Biology

Cheryl Leyns - Molecular Cell Biology

Dov Lerman-Sinkoff - Biomedical Engineering

Lucy Li - Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis

Stephen Linderman - Biomedical Engineering

Cates Mallaney - Human & Statistical Genetics

Hannah Miller - Immunology

Anish Mitra - Neurosciences

Arnav Moudgil - Computational & Systems Biology

Patrick Olson - Molecular Microbiology & Microbial Pathogenesis

Eugene Park - Immunology

Chelsea Parker Harp - Immunology

Caitlin Purman - Molecular Genetics & Genomics

Michelle Robinette - Immunology

Emilie Russler-Germain - Immunology

Alexandra Russo​ - Neurosciences

Gregory Schimizzi - Molecular Cell Biology

Sarah Smith - Neurosciences

Benjamin Solomon - Immunology

Avik Som - Biomedical Engineering

Calvin Stephens - Molecular Genetics and Genomics

Manouela Valtcheva - Neurosciences

Samantha (Bayer) Van Hove - Molecular Cell Biology

External Fellowship Awardees
20
Yes
  
Washington University Spouses and Partners Association (WUSPA)

WUSPA (http://wuspa.wustl.edu) is a support network for the spouses and partners of Washington University affiliates—students, postdocs, staff and faculty. WUSPA provides information and referrals to connect spouses and partners with resources at Washington University and in the St. Louis area, fosters friendship in a new community, and supports both the personal and professional growth of its membership. WUSPA hosts occasional daytime meetings and seasonal potluck party. WUSPA also has a variety of interest groups that meet as well. For more information, please visit the WUSPA website or email Toshiko Imai at toshistl@gmail.com or Elena Maksaeva at elena.stlouis@gmail.com.

Organizations & Campus Groups- Open to All
10
Yes
  
LGBT Health

The LGBT He​alth Interest Group is a group of medical students dedicated to addressing the health care needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender patients and physicians.

http://lgbthealth.wustl.edu/

Organizations & Campus Groups- Open to All
6
Yes
  
InPrint

​InPrint is a trainee-run scientific editing network and resource that provides free, confidential editing of scientific communications to the Washington University research community. The group’s mission is to improve the quality of scientific communication, encourage discussions among authors, enhance communication skills, and support trainees’ professional development. InPrint​ offers a variety of editing services including reviewing documents for organization of content, writing structure and clarity, and use of English language.

If you are interested in our services or participating as an editor, learn more at inprintscience.wustl.edu.

Organizations & Campus Groups- Open to All
5
Yes
  
2017 - William Gillanders

William Gillanders

The physician-scientist and avid cyclist is keeping the wheels turning in the race against breast cancer 

By Jim Goodwin
Photo by Robert Boston

William Gillanders, MD, is developing a vaccine aimed at harnessing the immune system to fight breast cancer. If proven effective as a cancer treatment, the vaccine someday could be used to prevent breast cancer, too.
 
It might not be the perfect metaphor, but science and cycling have some things in common. They can be grueling or exhilarating, depending on where you are in the process.
 
Both require hard work and determination. And like cycling, science can be an individual and team endeavor at the same time. William Gillanders, MD, knows these things firsthand. He’s not only a Washington University breast surgeon at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Siteman Cancer Center, but an avid cyclist. The 49-year-old pursues both interests daily and often finds ways in which they intersect.
 
“There is a metaphor there,” he said. “My goal is to change breast cancer treatment paradigms, to make vaccines a reality for women who are being treated for breast cancer. That’s an ambitious goal but one that I think I can tackle. It’s a career goal; it’s not one that can happen overnight. It’s like preparing for a 100-mile century ride. It is a goal that you have to really work on to make it a reality. Of course, a breast cancer vaccine is much more challenging.”
Your research centers on something many never considered possible – a vaccine for breast cancer. Tell us about your work.
The goal of a cancer vaccine is to harness the immune system to fight cancer. Recent studies confirm that the immune system plays an important role in controlling the growth of cancer. Our vaccine targets a protein, mammaglobin-A, that is expressed in almost all breast cancers. The vaccine trains the immune system to find and destroy cells with this protein. If the vaccine proves effective as a cancer treatment, it may someday be used to prevent breast cancer, too.
How long have you been working on this?
I’ve been interested in mammaglobin biology for more than 10 years. My interest predates my recruitment to Washington University in 2005. At the Medical University of South Carolina, where I was previously on the faculty, we were using mammaglobin as a molecular marker for detecting metastatic breast cancer either in the lymph nodes, bone marrow or peripheral blood. It is one of the best molecular markers for the detection of breast cancer.
A main reason why I chose to come back to Washington University – I was a trainee here in general surgery from 1991-99 – was the opportunity to be part of a multidisciplinary team working to develop breast cancer vaccines. We have a very strong immunology community at Washington University School of Medicine, and I’ve been thrilled with the generosity and willingness of investigators here to collaborate. 
Talk about the potential of cancer immunotherapy.
It’s very similar to the story of antibodies for cancer therapy. When antibodies were first identified, the thought was that they’d be the magic bullet. The initial studies with antibody therapy were underwhelming; they were only marginally successful, if that. But we learned a lot in those studies about how and when to use antibody therapies. Now, they’re really a mainstay of modern cancer treatment.
The same is true of immunotherapy. Initially, there was great enthusiasm because of the potential promise, but it’s only because the initial studies were not successful that we were able to learn how to best use immunotherapy. Part of the reason why the enthusiasm has returned is because of the dramatic success of recent immunotherapy trials. 
Give us a broad overview of breast cancer vaccine research.
The vaccine landscape has changed quite a bit. Five years ago, there might have been three to five breast cancer vaccine trials nationwide. Now there probably are 20-plus. There’s a growing realization that, if used appropriately, vaccine therapy can be effective. 
Is the holy grail a vaccine that could prevent cancer in the first place? Is that the ultimate goal of your research?
That’s right. The holy grail would be a vaccine that could prevent the development of cancer. But several steps must be accomplished before we get there. The first is development of a vaccine that’s safe and very effective. Once we have that, we’ll start to use it in early-stage disease or in women who are at high risk for breast cancer and then, ultimately, in healthy women.
I know there’s a lot of frustration that you can’t just move forward to evaluate these vaccines in healthy women, but the reality is, if you’re going to give an investigational treatment to healthy individuals, you have to have enormous confidence that it is safe and effective. There has to be an appropriate balance between the potential risks of an investigational agent and the benefits. 
Switching gears, you’re an active cyclist and a daily bike commuter. How many miles a week do you ride?
I don’t track how many miles or hours I ride, but I ride my bike to work every day. It’s a great way to start and end the day. In the morning, it wakes you up and gets you ready for everything you need to do. And in the evening, it wipes the slate clean so you don’t bring any stress home. I’m very lucky because I have a very pleasant commute. I bike through Forest Park, up and down Wydown Boulevard and through Shaw Park. 
Bike commuters tend to take in more of what’s going on around them. What are some things you’ve seen while riding to and from campus?
I’ve seen all kinds of wild animals. There’s a family of foxes that lives around Wydown Boulevard in Clayton. In Forest Park, there’s a mated pair of owls that has baby owls every year. It’s fun to track their progress. We’re just getting into the season now when you’ll be seeing lots of baby geese. There are all kinds of raccoons and other wild animals in the park. 
COURTESY OF W. GILLANDERS
Jeanne (top left) and William Gillanders have three children. They are (from left) Teddy, Emma and Ian. “They are very supportive of me and my work, so I’m very, very appreciative of their understanding and patience,” William Gillanders said.
That sounds like a relaxing transition to home. Tell us a little about your life there.
I’m very fortunate to have a fantastic family. My wife, Jeanne, is a teacher, so she sets the tone for the kids and the importance of schoolwork. And we have three kids who are growing up very quickly. My daughter, Emma, is a freshman in high school. Our son Ian is in seventh grade, and our other son, Teddy, is in fifth grade. They’re a lot of fun. They are very supportive of me and my work, so I’m very, very appreciative of their understanding and patience. Whenever I travel I miss home quite a bit. 
Talk about being a physician-scientist. The two are related, of course, but also very different.
I have one foot in the clinical realm and one foot in the research realm. My goal is to bridge those two worlds, to collaborate with all the great basic scientists here at Washington University School of Medicine and help them move their great ideas into the clinic. 
Your father is a physician, too. What medicine did he practice? Was he the inspiration behind what you’re doing today?
Yes, my father is a retired obstetrician-gynecologist, in one of the surgical subspecialties. I remember him talking about surgery when I was younger.
One of the things I’ve enjoyed quite a bit with my father recently is that when he comes to visit he likes to walk. So I set aside my bike and we walk to work together. He’s in his 70s, and he walks fast. That’s really been a great time to bond with him. My father and I have seen some of the wildlife I mentioned earlier. One morning we were visited by a bald eagle that flew right over our heads. It’s an hour-and-45-minute walk, and often as we trek through Forest Park the sun comes up. It’s a great way for my father and me to spend time together. 
Another way you’ve combined your work and personal life is through Pedal the Cause, the annual cycling fundraiser for cancer research at Siteman Cancer Center and St. Louis Children’s Hospital. You’ve received grants from the group; you’re a participant in the bike ride.
I’ve been an avid cyclist for many years, and I remember meeting the founder, Bill Koman, before the first Pedal the Cause in 2010. He was very excited about the event, and I share his passion and enthusiasm. 
I’ve done every Pedal the Cause so far. Initially, I was captain of the Siteman Cancer Center team. Since then, individuals from that original team have gone on to start eight or 10 new teams. These teams are focused on difference cancers, such as breast cancer, pancreas cancer, lymphoma, head and neck cancer, prostate cancer and other cancers. There’s a lot of enthusiasm for Pedal the Cause, and I’ve had a lot of fun doing it. I just wish that the funding decisions would integrate finishing time into the overall algorithm for deciding on who is funded! 
What kind of patients would be helped by your research?
We have two clinical trials in the works. One is already open to patients; the other soon will be. For the open trial, we’re recruiting newly diagnosed patients to study the safety and effectiveness of our mammaglobin-A vaccine. For the other trial​, we will recruit 30 patients. Although it remains to be determined what cancer patients will benefit most from these vaccines, I think there is potential that vaccines ultimately will be used in all stages of the disease.

Past Faculty Spotlights
10
Yes
  
January 2018 - Aparna Deora

​​Aparna Deora.jpgAparna Deora
(Molecular Genetics, 2000)
Lab of Dr. Lee Ratner
Senior Director leading Quality Control, Stability and Microbiology in BioTherapeutics Pharmaceutical Sciences at Pfizer

Honors and awards: Pfizer Individual Achievement Award (2005) 
 
What was your career path like after graduating from Washington University? After leaving Washington University, I moved to an industry position at Pharmacia. I worked in a discovery group that looked at Cox-2 inhibitors and cancer. The work included academic collaboration and was not totally unlike work I had in academia. I then shifted into drug development as Pfizer. I had the unique opportunity to be at the start, as Pfizer embarked on building a biological portfolio that has transitioned from a small molecule company to a company with biologics in development.  
My roles have changed over the past 15 years at Pfizer, and I have had the amazing opportunity to work on developing a range of therapeutic modalities from mAbs, vaccines, cell based therapies and gene therapy from early toxicology studies, through clinical development and even achieving a few successful commercial products.
 
Why did you choose Washington University DBBS for your PhD training?
In looking through the faculty profiles during the application process, I knew I would have an opportunity to choose to work in a great lab and have the opportunity to do some amazing research. I remember being very impressed by the faculty and students I met during the interview and that helped finalize the decision. 
 
How did your time at WashU prepare you for your current career?
WashU is wonderful training. I learned so much about how to do a "smart" experiment, think critically and perhaps most importantly how to communicate scientific research. It is also amazing to build a network of friends and scientists across the world. 
 
What are some of your favorite memories from your time at WashU? What was your favorite part about living in St. Louis?
The camaraderie in the lab and with my fellow students will never be forgotten. While not easy, it is a rare time when you can focus on science and be supported by all around you.
Amazingly, my classmates even have an annual "Wall Party" reunion held each year around the country. Great to catch up and see what is going on across with old friends.  
I still live in St. Louis and love it. It is a great city with a lot of cultural activities and good food. I love that there is so much free stuff to do like the zoo, Science Center, museums, concerts. etc. It was great to have so many options on the grad school stipend. 
 
What hobbies do you enjoy?
Travel, reading, cooking and yoga.
 
What is your favorite quote?
“You must do the thing you think you cannot do.” - Eleanor Roosevelt 
 
What movie would be greatly improved if it were made into a musical?
Princess Bride would be a fun musical. I would love to see a horror musical as well, maybe The Exorcist?
 
Who is your biggest role model?
My parents. 
 
What advice would you give to both prospective and current graduate students?
Grad school isn't easy but it really is worth it. You will do some great science but perhaps more importantly you will learn about yourself, and it is an accomplishment you can be proud of achieving.  
Most importantly, don't forget to have fun!
 
Past Alumni Spotlights
1
Yes
  
January 2018 - Samarth Hegde

Samarth Hegde
samarth hegde.jpgMolecular Cell Biology, incoming class 2014
Lab of Dr. David DeNardo

What is your educational/professional background?
I got my undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences in India, at BITS Pilani. I conducted post-baccalaureate research at the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine (inStem) in Bangalore, India. During this time, I worked in the lab of Dr. Srikala Raghavan on epithelial cell biology.

Why did you choose to attend Washington University DBBS?
What is your favorite part about pursuing your PhD training here?
I was attracted to WashU and DBBS specifically for its umbrella program and its close ties to Siteman Cancer Center. I knew my interests in translational oncology would need a graduate program that was wide in its breadth of cancer research but also extensive enough in each arm to allow for focused professional development. I was very impressed by the genuineness and candid nature of DBBS faculty and students. The environment doesn't feel cut-throat at all, but don't get me wrong -- the expectations from you as a graduate student at WashU are always very high.

Slightly off the beaten path, the favorite part of my PhD 'training' has been the weekly student-run seminars (SRS), which are not only a great way to learn how to present without the perceived pressure from faculty, but also a very important way to learn how to give or receive scientific feedback.

What research are you currently working on? What is a fun fact about your current research?
I am conducting research in the tumor immunology lab of Dr. David DeNardo. Our lab focuses on the immune microenvironment of pancreatic cancer, which is a dismal disease with very poor outcomes and high recalcitrance to treatment.

My research revolves around understanding the key physiological barriers to CD8 T cell surveillance in pancreatic cancer. I use a combination of genetic/orthotopic mouse models, tissue imaging and ex vivo T cell-tumor interaction studies to determine why these cytotoxic T cells are ineffective in controlling tumors despite the presence of sufficient cues (tumor antigens). We have a unique model that enables us to study the basic biology of antigen-specific T cell interactions in naturally progressing disease, and presents opportunity to develop combinational therapies that can reawaken the poor T cell response. Results from my research will better our current immunological understanding of pancreatic cancer progression.

Fun fact: As part of my dissertation research, I am slowly learning really cool techniques such as second-harmonic deep tissue imaging to visualize immune cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

Are you involved in any student groups, volunteer work or other ventures outside of the lab?
I am closely involved with the BioEntrepreneurship Core (BEC), a student educational group through which students and post-graduates can learn about entrepreneurial skills and opportunities in St. Louis or beyond. This experience has greatly enhanced my understanding of translating graduate research and the 'businessy' aspect of bringing an idea to fruition. 

What is your favorite part about living in St. Louis?
St. Louis never feels like a big city despite being one. I can decide the pace or energy for my day, and not have the city decide that for me. Best of all, the city always surprises me with its hidden treasures; whether it be interesting food places, new bars or fun events. Often it's free or ridiculously affordable, which is never a bad thing on a graduate stipend.

What hobbies do you enjoy?
I enjoy reading literary fiction and collecting graphic novels; I am also into street photography but have been slacking off recently. Having become a craft beer snob, I have picked up home-brewing with some of my graduate school friends and that's been great!

What is your favorite quote?
"Quis custodiet ipsos custodes" - not from 'Satires', but from the graphic novel 'Watchmen'.

Is a hot dog a sandwich?
I would rather not wade into this trap...

Who is your biggest role model?
I really can't think of one person having that big of an influence, but one of the notable people I look up to is my previous mentor Dr. Srikala Raghavan. During my formative stage in science, I was deeply inspired by her collaborative achievements, unending enthusiasm for scientific discovery, and selfless interest in graduate training. I have seen these traits recurrent in so many successful academics including my current mentor Dr. DeNardo, and hope to follow in their footsteps.

What career would you like to pursue after completing your PhD training?
I plan to pursue academic research in my field of tumor immunology. I will apply for postdoctoral research opportunities in this field to prepare myself for eventual tenure-track research. The NCIF99 fellowship I have received will go a long way in enabling such a transition. I'm cognizant of the current dearth of academic careers, but feel I'm preparing myself well to be a competitive candidate for the research track.

What advice would you give to prospective graduate students?
I'll limit this to three: 

1) Don't join labs/graduate programs just because the Investigator is a big name or the lab's research is the buzzword of that year. It's your research interest foremost, followed by lab environment. You'll be a part of that lab for a large chunk of your life, pick a lab you would enjoy coming in on each day (or most days).

2) There will be a lot of times you will feel inadequate in comparison to peers or other people in lab. Imposter syndrome is very real and very draining. Don't feel ashamed to acknowledge it; having a strong peer support system (helpful mentors, friends inside and outside science) is key. Don't let go of that favorite hobby of yours too!

3) Pick up a valuable skill or technique in your graduate career that makes you marketable or competitive. The earlier you identify that and start working on it, the better.

Please list any grants, awards, publications, or other honors you have received during your time at DBBS.
I am the 2017 recipient of the NCI F99/K00 Predoctoral-to-Postdoctoral Fellow transition award for Washington University. The purpose of the award is to encourage students recognized for their potential and strong interest in pursuing careers as independent cancer researchers. The F99 phase supports 2 years of predoctoral research, and the K00 phase supports up to 4 years of mentored postdoc research. This award can facilitate my seamless transition into a successful postdoctoral appointment in cancer biology, while providing me with opportunities for career development relevant to my long-term academic goals.

I have contributed to two publications in the DeNardo lab:
-Jiang, H., Hegde, S., Knolhoff, B. L., Zhu, Y., Herndon, J. M., Meyer, M. A., et al. (2016). Targeting focal adhesion kinase renders pancreatic cancers responsive to checkpoint immunotherapy. Nature Medicine, 22(8), 851-860.-Jiang, H., Hegde, S., and DeNardo, D.G. (2017) Tumor-associated fibrosis as a regulator of tumor immunity and response toimmunotherapy. Cancer Immunology Immunotherapy, 1-12.

Please list any other information you would like to share for your spotlight.
For more information on the F99 funding mechanism, check out https://www.cancer.gov/grants-training/training/funding/f99

Past Student Spotlights
1
Yes
  
2017 - Jennifer Lodge

Jennifer Lodge.jpgJennifer Lodge
Vice Chancellor for Research

Plant Biology, Ph.D. Received 1988
Thesis Advisor: Douglas E. Burg, PhD 

 

Jennifer K. Lodge, PhD (’88), associate dean for research and professor of molecular microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has been appointed vice chancellor for research for the university. Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton; Larry J. Shapiro, MD, executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of the School of Medicine; and H. Holden Thorp, PhD, provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs, made the announcement.
Lodge, whose appointment is effective July 1, succeeds Evan Kharasch, MD, PhD, the Russell D. and Mary B. Shelden Professor of Anesthesiology and professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics. He is stepping down after serving in the role since 2009.
“We are extremely pleased that Professor Lodge has agreed to lend her considerable talents to this important role, and very grateful to Evan Kharasch for his years of distinguished service,” Wrighton said. “Our research enterprise is an integral part of the university’s mission, and I am confident that, under Jenny’s leadership, our ambitious goals in this critical area will be met and exceeded.”
Lodge will assume a dual role and continue as associate dean for research at the School of Medicine, a position to which she was appointed in 2009. Since then, she has coordinated efforts to advance research at the School of Medicine, with a particular focus on interdisciplinary projects involving multiple departments and core facilities that serve a wide variety of researchers. She has assisted faculty in identifying potential funding opportunities and maximizing the benefits of school-wide investments in research.
“Professor Lodge’s demonstrated success in leading sponsored research administration makes her exceptionally well-qualified for this position,” Thorp said. “Her passion and determination will be tremendous assets as we push to grow our research enterprise and translate the results of these efforts into benefits for society.”
“We are committed to pursuing research that will lead to innovative solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges,” Shapiro said. “Jenny Lodge has the vision, expertise and enthusiasm to help researchers at the university achieve these efforts.”
In her new role, Lodge will serve as an officer of Washington University and a member of the University Council. She will be the chief officer responsible for the university’s research mission, overseeing more than $600 million in annual sponsored research and managing the development of research policies, grants and contracts, and the continuing education of faculty and staff regarding research regulations.
Lodge previously served as associate dean for research and professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine; had postdoctoral fellowships at Monsanto Co. and Washington University; and served as a research assistant at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and at Harvard University. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio, and her doctorate in biomedical sciences from Washington University in 1988.
Lodge was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2011 and a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology in 2010. She has published more than 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals and holds a U.S. patent for virus-resistant potato plants. She continues to pursue NIH-funded research on mechanisms of fungal pathogenesis, anti-fungal drug discovery and vaccine development.
Past Alumni Spotlights
10
Yes
  
Spring 2016

The Basics of Excellent Public Speaking

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, 11 am
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4180

Graduate Research Symposium Preparatory Workshop
Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, 12 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4185

Using LinkedIn to Network and Apply for Jobs in and out of Science
Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016, 1:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4263

Using PowerPoint as an Effective Public Speaking Tool
Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016, 11 am
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4228

Cross-Cultural Competency Workshop: A Framework for Understanding Cultural Differences
Monday, Feb. 29, 2016, 3 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4342

Time Management
Thursday, March 10, 2016, 11 am
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4370

PowerPoint Workshop
Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 1:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4400

Improv for Professional Communication
Thursday, April 7, 2016, 10 am
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4461

Cross-Cultural Communication in the Lab
Wednesday, April 13, 2016, 1 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4470

Behavioral Interviewing Workshop
Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 2:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4472

Cross-Cultural Communication in Clinical Settings
Thursday, April 21, 2016, 11 am
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4471

Trust & Teamwork
Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 1 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4489

Crucial Conversations
Tuesday, May 10, 2016, 2 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4490
Professional Development Programming
6
Yes
  
Fall 2015

How to Find Funding

Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, 11 am
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3798

The Future of Research: How Early Career Researchers Can Shape the Biomedical Research Landscape, with Jessica Polka of Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 5, 2015, 1:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3908

Preparing For Your Postdoc
Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015, 10 am
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4012

Improv for Professional Communication 
Mondays, Dec. 7 & 14, 2015, 2 pm
Professional Development Programming
8
Yes
  
Fall 2014

Managing Your Research Work Flow: Using a Citation Management Program
Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014, 12noon
Register & more info:  http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3013

H
ow to Find Funding
Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, 4pm
Register & more info:http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3037   

Professional Development Programming
10
Yes
  
Spring 2015

Individual Development Plan Workshops

Tuesday, February 24, 2015 10am
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3462 ​​

March 6, 2015, 11am
Register & more info:  http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3463

April 30, 2015, 12:30pm
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3547


Professional Development Programming

Time Management
Wednesday, January 21, 2015, 12noon
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3274

Presentation Skills
Wednesday, January 28, 2015, 12:30pm
Register & more info:  http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3275


Communication Skills
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 12noon
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3276   


Conflict Resolution 
Wednesday, February 11, 2015 12:30pm
Register & more info:  http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3277  

Professional Development Programming
9
Yes
  
Fall 2017

 

September
Resiliency: Bouncing Back After a Setback (webinar)
Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, 11:30 am (online)

 

Register & more info: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2707116754013860097

A Recruiter's Perspective on Hiring Scientists & Engineers (webinar)
Wednesday, Sept. 27, 12 pm (online)
Register & more info: https://careerdevelopment.aaas.org/a-recruiters-perspective-on-hiring-scientists-and-engineers/


October
Where Are You Going? Goal-Setting for Success (webinar)
Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, 12 pm (online)
Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, 12 pm, Schwarz Auditorium

NIH & Other Public Access Policies
Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, 12 pm, FLTC 214
Register & more info: https://becker.wustl.edu/civicrm/event/info?id=235&reset=1
 
Identify Your Transferrable Skills
Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium
 
How to Fail Better
Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium
 
November
Live Demo: NCBI My Bibliography
Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, 12 pm, FLTC 214
Register & more info: https://becker.wstl.edu/civicrm/event/info?id=236&reset=1
NIH Mock Study Section
Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, 12 pm, TBA
More info: https://crtc.wustl.edu/otg/nih-mock-study-section/ 

Scopus
Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, 12 pm, FLTC 214
Register & more info: https://becker.wustl.edu/civicrm/event/info?id=238&reset=1

Communicating Your Research With the Public
Tuesday, Nov 28, 2017, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium

 
December
Communicating Your Research With the Public
Friday, Dec. 1, 12 pm, 2017, DUC 234 (Danforth Campus)
Career Exploration: Identify Your Skills, Interests, Values
Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, 2 pm, Holden
 
Career Exploration: Informational Interviewing
Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, 2 pm, Erlanger Auditorium
 
Using Electronic Lab Notebooks - CANCELLED
Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium
Professional Development Programming
4
Yes
  
Spring 2017

January 2017

Using Mentoring and Individual Development Plans
Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, 3:30 pm, Wohl Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4963 
Prepping for the Career Fair + SLAMs

Multiple dates and times: Jan. 20-Jan. 24 (Danforth Campus)
Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, 6 pm, Danforth Campus, Danforth University Center, Tisch Commons

 

February 2017

Searching OVID Medline
Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, 2 pm, FLTC 602
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5206 

Graduate Research Symposium Poster Session Preparation (Grad Students Only)
Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, 12 pm, Liberman Graduate Center, DUC 300 (Danforth Campus)
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5196 

New Grant-Writing Tools for R and K Mechanisms (Postdocs Only)
Thursday, Feb. 17, 2017, 12 pm, Schwarz Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5006

Discovering Your Strengths (Grad Students Only)
Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, 4 pm, Liberman Graduate Center, DUC 300 (Danforth Campus)

Selecting a Journal for Publication
Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, 12:30 pm, FLTC 214

 
March 2017
How to Create Powerful Search Materials: CVs, Resumes, Cover Letters
Tuesday, March 7 (Medical  Campus), Wednesday, March 8 (Danforth Campus) 
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5136

Networking Workshop
Tuesday, March 14 (Medical Campus), Wednesday, March 15 (Danforth Campus)
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5138 

Interview & Negotiate Like a Pro
Tuesday, March 21 (Medical Campus), Wednesday, March 22 (Danforth Campus)
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5140

Increasing Student Engagement Among Peers (Grad Students Only)
Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 4, pm, Liberman Graudate Center, DUC 300 (Danforth Campus)
More info:
http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5086

Opportunites for Ph.D.s Beyond the Research Professoriate
Tuesday, March 28 (Medical Campus), Wednesday, March 29 (Danforth Campus)
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5142

Professional Development Programming
5
Yes
  
Fall 2016

September 2016 

What to Look for When Searching for a Postdoc Position
Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016, 12 pm, Holden Auditorium
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4684 

Citations & Opportunites for Graduate Students*
Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, 1 pm, Erlanger Auditorium
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4683 

How to Keep a Good Research Notebook*
Thursday, Sep. 22, 2016, 1 pm, Erlanger Auditorium
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4677 
Communicating Science 2016 Symposium
Monday, Sept. 26-Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, EPNEC
 
Individual Development Plan (IDP) Workshop*
Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, 1 pm, Erlanger Auditorium

October 2016

Grant Resources for STEM
Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 4 pm, DUC 300, Danforth Campus
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4669 

Individual Development Plan (IDP) Workshop
Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 1 pm, Holden Auditorium
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4824  


November 2016

8 Ways to Successfully Navigate NIH Peer Review and Get a Fellowship Grant
Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 1 pm, Holden Auditorium
 
Versatile PhD Workshop: Session 1
Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 4 pm, DUC 300, Danforth Campus

Versatile PhD Workshop: Session 2
Thurs., Nov. 10, 2016, 4 pm, DUC 300, Danforth CampusNov. 10, 2016, 4 pm, DUC 300, Danforth Campus
 

December 2016

NIH Peer Review Briefing for Basic Research Applicants and Reviewers
Friday, Dec. 2, 2016, 1 pm, Cori Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4851

Research: What's Leadership Got to Do with It?
Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, 3:30 pm, Wohl Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4916

The NINDS Diversity Career Development K22 Award: Tips for Preparing Your Application (Webinar for Postdocs)
Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, 2 pm, online
Professional Development Programming
6
Yes
  
Spring 2016

My Personal and Yet Profoundly Public Transition from Acadmia to Business and Non-profits, with Neurosciences Alumnus Jerry Nguyen, Ph.D.
Monday, Jan. 4, 2016, 1:30 pm 
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4182

Eli Lilly and Company Information Session
Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, 2 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4181

Boston Consulting Group Recruiting
Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, 5 pm
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4247

University Careers Beyond the Lab

Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, 1:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4285

University Careers Beyond the Lab
Thursday, March 17, 2016, 1:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4365

Science Writing Career Talk with DBBS Alumna Tina Saey, Ph.D.
Friday, April 29, 2016, 1:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4256

Career Talk with FDA Microbiologist Adrian Land, Ph.D.
Tuesday, May 17, 2016, 9:30 am
Career Talks
7
Yes
  
Fall 2015

Non-Tenure Track Careers for STEM Ph.D.s
Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, 9 am

Career Talks
8
Yes
  
Spring 2015

Succeeding in an Industrial Research Environment
Friday, January 9th, 12noon
Register & more info:  http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3279


Combining Pharmaceutial Industry and Teaching 
Tuesday, April 7th, 9am
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3545  ​​


Non-Tenure Track Administrative Roles in Academia
Thursday, April 23, 9am CANCELLED - Will be rescheduled for later in 2015
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3589   

Career Talks
9
Yes
  
Fall 2014

Charting a Path to a Career in Science Policy with Dr. Chris Pickett
Friday, Sept. 12th, 9am
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3039  
co-sponsored with ProSPER, WU Graduate Students Promoting Science Policy, Education and Research.

Career Coffee Hour: From Academics to Biopharma with Dr. Leroy Wheeler
Friday, Nov. 7th, 9am
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3040
co-sponsored with the WU Postdoc Society​

Career Talks
10
Yes
  
Fall 2017

Lunchtime Career Seminar with Steve Doberstein

Tuesday, October 31, 11:45 am-1:00 pm, Needleman Library, 3907 South Building
Email Melissa Torres at torresm@wustl.edu to RSVP
 

Careers in Industry - An interactive Q&A with Sharon Semones
Thursday, November 30, 2017, 2:00-3:00 pm, Holden Auditorium, FLTC
RSVP:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/careers-in-industry-an-interactive-qa-with-sharon-semones-registration-39616812954
Career Talks
4
Yes
  
Spring 2017

Tauseef Charanya, Ph.D., Boston Consulting Group
Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, 1:00 pm, Becker 405
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5213 

Virtual Career Fair
Thursday, March 2, 2017, 8 am-5 pm, online
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5107

Wendy Chapman, Ph.D., Chair of Biomedical Informatics at University of Utah School of Medicine
Thursday, March 2, 2017, 4:00 pm, Becker Library King Center
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5246 

D. E. Shaw Research Information Session
Thursday, March 9, 2017, 5:00 pm, Connor Auditorium, FLTC
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=5235

Career Talks
5
Yes
  
Fall 2016

Andy Geisse Career Talk
Friday, Sept. 16, 2016, 10:15 am, McMillen Lab 311, Danforth Campus
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4754

Boston Consulting Group
Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, 2 pm, FLTC 207
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4755 


The Influence of Graduate Teaching and Volunteerism on Academic and Non-academic Career Paths
Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, 1:30 pm, Connor Auditorium
More info: http://us6.campaign-archive1.com/?u=d19f21f109&id=60b469f897 

Paul R. Eisenberg Career Talk
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 3:00 pm, Cori Auditorium
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4883

 
Precision Medicine Pathway Career Panel
Monday, Dec. 5, 2016, 3:00 pm, McDonnell Sciences 426
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4971

Career Talks
6
Yes
  
Fall 2015

Creating a Teaching Philosophy Statement

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015, 3:30 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3797

Panel Discussion: Diversity Statements
Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015, 2 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3885
 
Faculty Career Hiring Panel
Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015, 1 pm
 
The Chalk Talk
Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2015, 1 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4011

*Special Session* Midstates Consortium Faculty Panel
Saturday, Nov. 7, 2015, 12:15 pm

L
ab Set Up
Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015, 1 pm
Register and more info:
http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4010

Lab Finances
Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015, 1 pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4009
Faculty Career Search Series
9
Yes
  
Fall 2014

Creating a Teaching Philosophy & Teaching Portfolio for the Academic Job Market 
Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014, 12noon
Register & more info:  http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3002

Academic Career Hiring Panel
Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014 4pm
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3038

The Chalk Talk
Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014 12noon
Register and more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3017

L
ab Set Up
Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, 12noon
Register & more info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3014

Lab Finances
Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, 12noon
Register & more info:  http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=3003  

Faculty Career Search Series
10
Yes
  
Fall 2016

Writing a Teaching Philosophy Statement
Tuesday, August 30, 2016, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4605

Addressing Inclusion & Diversity in Job Market Materials
Thursday, October 20, 2016, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4681

Faculty Career Hiring Panel
Thursday, November 3, 2016, 1 pm, Holden Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4798

The Chalk Talk
Tuesday, November 8, 2016, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4877

Lab Set-Up
Thursday, December 1, 2016, 2 pm, Holden Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4908 

Lab Finances
Thursday, January 12, 2017, 3 pm, Holden Auditorium
More info: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/Resources/Pages/calendar_event.aspx?EvID=4917​

Faculty Career Search Series
8
Yes
1 - 30Next